Track the number of in-storage aircraft globally with new analysis from Cirium

Cirium brings together powerful data and analytics to keep the world in motion. Delivering insight, built from decades of experience in the sector, enabling travel companies, aircraft manufacturers, airports, airlines and financial institutions, among others, to make logical and informed decisions which shape the future of travel, growing revenues and enhancing customer experiences.

The spread of COVID-19 has caused the world’s airlines to temporarily ground significant portions (and in many cases the majority) of their fleets due to increasing travel restrictions and tightened borders.

Latest analysis from Cirium shows that the in-storage fleet as classified by Cirium has grown by 13.5% in the past 24 hours, with a total of 6,639 in-storage globally. This includes 2,542 Boeing aircraft, comprising 1,671 narrowbody aircraft and 871 widebody aircraft.

A breakdown of Boeing aircraft types currently in-storage can be found below:

·     45 717s 

·     6 727s

·     383 737 Max

·     1087 737s (-200 -300 -400 -500-600-700-800-900)

·     108 747s 

·     150 757s

·     154 767s 

·     376 777s 

·     233 787s 

Meanwhile, 2,608 Airbus aircraft are currently in-storage, including 1,837 narrowbody aircraft and 771 widebody aircraft.

A breakdown of Airbus aircraft types currently in-storage is as follows:

·       33 A220

·       11 A300

·       8 A310

·       23 A318s

·       338 A319s

·       948 A320

·       112 A320neos

·       325 A321s 

·       58 A321neos

·       467 A330s

·       18 A330neos

·       117 A340s

·       66 A350s

·       84 A380s

Cirium is also recording daily hours and cycles of the global fleet using data from the Cirium Core – the number one source for aviation data and analytics.

Taking the Boeing 777 Familyas an example, this data shows a net reduction in the tracked active fleet of 250 aircraft, to below 700 aircraftin total, comparing Sunday March 22 with Sunday March 15, 2020.